March 3. Yes, I failed to post the assignment for Thursday, despite my best attempts. So here we go: here's the essay question for the Lincoln second inaugural in-class writing, now scheduled for Tuesday. Please spend some time brainstorming and preparing. We will write the essay in the Mac Lab during class tomorrow.
HW: Prepare for in-class writing

March 4. Mac Lab, Main 306. In-class writing, written in Google docs and shared with me, mdunne@thayer.org.
HW: Consider: 1: Are you interested in the essay contest below? 2: What would we as a class like to do for a speech-based project, either individually or as a group?

Essay Contest.jpg

March 5. Finish essay if necessary. Brainstorm project ideas. Begin project proposals (essay contest, declamation/historical re-enactments, STAND speech writing and delivery, web-based speech analysis, other options?). Proposal due by end of class Thursday.

March 6. Assign short speeches to cover tomorrow, 10-15 minutes per speech.
Group 1: Theodore Roosevelt, "The Natural Wonder of the Grand Canyon" pp. 1-2
Group 2: Mary Church Terrell, "What It Means To Be Colored in the Capital of the United States" pp. 3-6
Group 3: Emma Goldman, "What Is Patriotism?" pp. 7-9
Group 4: Carlos Montezuma, "Light on the Indian Situation" pp. 10-14

March 25. Discuss Carlos Montezuma speech (see above). Group reading and discussion of Booker T. Washington's Atlanta Compromise speech.
HW: Read Carlos Montezuma speech to engage in discussion tomorrow.

March 26. Finish Atlanta Compromise reading and discussion. Group 4 will lead Carlos Montezuma discussion.
HW: Read Marcus Garvey, "The Handwriting Is on the Wall" (pp. 30-35).

March 27. We will really cover Montezuma, and begin our look at Marcus Garvey, too.

March 28. To the Mac Lab for independent project work.

April 1. Reading, reflecting, and discussing FDR's "Arsenal for Democracy" speech.
HW: Read and reflect on George S. Patton's speech, "The invasion of Normandy" (pp. 71-72)